OUR FAVORITE LISBON TO IMPROVE YOUR NEXT JOURNEY

Things to do in Lisbon

From tram trips to eerie mausoleums; bustling historical markets and nightclubs are a whole world of things to do in Lisbon. Here are our top 15.

My criminal life began in Lisbon.

Tonight we hit the bars in Bairro Alto (one of the best things to do in Lisbon), and we heard rumors of a black underground pastel de nata market in Bairro Alto. The bakeries create this delicious art, working all night to be delivered to local cafes for the first time in the morning. Commercial bakers sell them to partygoers directly from the basement window.

After a quick search, we found out that it was baked and I was chosen to make a deal. Waiting for my turn, I bought 4 bootleg-baked goods for € 1 each. Robbery. But this was a black market after all.

Someone shouted that the police were coming, so we ran to our place with our cakes. Adrenaline was high. Shame and guilt followed. Then get scared. Can we be arrested at such a young age for our role in cake smuggling?

But while I was biting my pastel de nata, which had just come out of the oven, the cake sounded warm from the heat, the custard was still warm, all the other thoughts devoted to pure happiness.

My criminal life ended that night, and I have since moved on to some of the most friendly tourist attractions I can do in Lisbon.

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THINGS TO DO IN LISBON / WARNING WORD

There are so many wonderful things you can do in Lisbon, that it is impossible to measure them all in any article. We have not yet talked about the magnificent Lisbon Cathedral or the many impressive Miradouros.

We did not include any significant secret collections at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation; beautiful hand-painted tiles at Museu Nacional do Azulejo; or a fine list of Asian art objects in the Eastern Museum. We also left the fascination of Lisbon with canned tuna, and took a day trip to Sintra.

Not because they are not qualified, there are just a lot of deceptive things to do in Lisbon. Instead, this is our selected list of city highlights. For an idea of ​​what you can get into, see our 3 days trip to Lisbon.1 – LOOK AT THE WATCH FROM ESÃO JORGE CASTLE

São Jorge Castle was once a Moorish palace, but subsequent residents changed the structure so much that only a handful of original buildings remain. However, as it served as the Royal Palace from the 13th to the 16th century, it lost much of its splendor.

The most compelling feature of the castle, however, is the stunning view of the beautiful city. The patchwork of Lisbon terracotta tiles only interrupted by narrow running lines is a must see.

The small castle museum has seen better days, so hurry up after your visit to explore the São Jorge Hill area. The streets around the castle as far as Lisbon Cathedral are filled with air. If it is not too late, stop at Chapitô à Mesa to get a glass of Portuguese wine for the purpose of remembrance. If it is too early, do it anyway.

The most compelling feature of São Jorge Castle is the amazing view of the city and the vibe of your local area.

2 – VISIT THE CLOISTERS OF SÃO VICENTE DE FORA

The Church of São Vicente de Fora has a long history, including the devastation of the 1755 earthquake. Completely renovated during the 17th century, it remains a magnificent hidden gem, which houses the tombs of many Portuguese Kings. It’s a good thing to do in Lisbon.

The church itself is honorable, but the cloister of the neighbors is quite impressive. The azulejos that tell the story of Lisbon cover the walls under the protection of a white shaved roof. The walls of the sacristy are covered with elaborate marble designs and intricate roofs.

Outstanding, however, are these horrible mausoleums containing the graves of religious soldiers. Look at the weeping and weeping woman looking at one of the graves.

An important feature of the Church of São Vicente de Fora is the mausoleum eerie that contains the graves of crusaders.

3 – HUNT FOR GRAYRE WEASD FEIRA DA LADRA (THIEVES ’MARKET)

In the vicinity of the National Pantheon, the fish market takes place twice a week (Tue & Sat) with a reputation known as the thief market. While the market news is full of stolen goods, the name actually comes from a ladro referring to a distraction found in antiques.

Still, it is one of the strangest things to do in Lisbon. The market sells everything you will ever need: old rolling wires, broken mannequins and pre-popular vinyl. There are also many handicrafts, CDs, military items and Nana’s discarded furniture. Tourist prices are often low, so use your best bet.

Take lunch at one of the tables overlooking the market for a fully immersive Lisbon experience. Even if you are here on a non-market day, square restaurants have a traditional Portuguese feel.

4 – LIMIT IN THE NATIONAL PANTEÃO DOME

The striking National Palace was originally built as a church but now has large and beautiful monuments, connected with the golden period of Portuguese history. Like many of the world’s landmarks in Lisbon, it pays homage to Vasco da Gama, a maritime warrior who restored wealth to Portugal.

Climbing the stairs to the inner edge of the blessed roof offers a magnificent view of what 16th-century money can buy. The door is festooned with marble geometric plaster, with many gold details and large stone columns.

As a prominent feature of the Lisbon skyline, a prominent view of the roof was one of our favorite things to do in Lisbon. As the winter sun reflects the white outer surface of the upper dome, Lisbon shines brightly in this area.

Panteão Nacional / 10am – 1pm; 2pm – 5pm | Price: € 4

The entrance to the National Secretariat is adorned with a geometric marble floor, intricately carved in gold and columns of large stone.

5 – ABSORB TIME FOR JERÓNIMO’S CHURCH & MONASTERY

Another treasure trove of the Portuguese Age of Discovery was used to set up magnificent monuments. Few are more impressive than the Jerónimos Monastery, built to commemorate the return of Vasco de Gama of India, who is also buried here.

The church also contains the tomb of Luís de Camões, a Portuguese poet. His grave is facing his wife’s so that they can be together when they are resurrected. Glass windows illuminate the tombs in an eerie ethereal way, next to well-carved, tall columns.

The cloister has a high-rise roof, held high by carved stone pillars. Although there is an installation fee, it is worth it. The golden courtyard of the inner courtyard is one of the most beautiful places to visit in Lisbon for opportunities for space photography.

Jerónimos Palace / 10am – 5:30 pm (Oct-Apr); 10 am – 6:30 pm (May-Sep) | Price: € 10; (+ Belém Tower € 12; + Archaeological Museum € 16)

6 – BREAK TO MODERN ART IN MUSEU COLEÇÃO BERARDO

Museu Coleção Berardo is a contemporary art offering of Lisbon. Located near the famous Belem area, the gallery has two eternal collections; and usually hosts two temporary exhibitions and other project installations.

The gallery is a great place to roam and something we highly recommend making time while visiting Lisbon. The Eternal Collection has an excellent label and offers a historical lesson on the development of modern art. Expect collisions with big names like Picasso, Duchamp, Miró, Warhol, and other lesser Portuguese artists.

The British and American pop art exhibition featured works from both sides of the pool, including Andy Warhol and David Hockney. The gallery has an educational program aimed at children aged 2 and up, designed to help them engage in art.

Koleção Berardo / 10am – 7pm | Price: € 5 (free on Saturday) | Tickets: Cross the line

Museu Coleção Berardo is an art form in Lisbon and a masterpiece in the art of modern art.

7 – CHECK THE PROMOTE BELÉM

Living on the banks of the Tagus River, the Belém Tower was first built to defend Lisbon. As an excellent example of Manueline’s architecture, it stands near the Jerónimos Monastery – two city celebrations leading to the Age of Discovery. Unlike Jerónimos, Belém Tower wears its beauty outside.

The top line can be stressful and we actually don’t encourage it. The best idea is to spend your time traveling around Belém. Good night, this is one of the best things you can do in Lisbon. Pass on the Padrão dos Descobrimentos, a monument to the powerful portrait of Portugal, before finding a place to take views of Lisbon’s Ponte 25 de Abri bridge.

Belém embraced Lisbon’s love of music with a variety of live bands lined the street or in a nearby park. The place has the most beautiful pastel de nata in the city at Antiga Confeitara de Belém – the only center worth waiting for.

Pass through Padrão dos Descobrimentos and stay tuned for local buskers in Belém.

8 – BUY AS COOL IN FACTORY LX

ILX Factory was an old textile industry that was transformed into a modern and creative space. Located at the bottom of the railway line, it is an example of urban renewal. LXF reused the neglected site, transforming it into a cool place to live. Private store collections include break-the-mold design sites, art supplies, vegan shoes and vintage stores.

The restaurant is dominated by modern thoughtful donations and a twisted Portuguese environment. We loved the Therna 1300 dinner with Landeau Chocolate for their strong adherence to the devotion of devout chocolates.

Of course, the LX Factory is probably more caring for tourists than locals. But with cooking classes, a tattoo artist, a modeling school, a pole dance studio and a tourist group called We Hate Travel Tourism, it’s worth some time to scratch under your face. The LXF has the best coffee in Lisbon and, in our opinion, some of the best street art.

ILX Factory was an old textile factory that was transformed into a modern and constructive space under the railway line.

9 – VISIT TO THE VILLAGE IN A TRUMM 28

If you could create a complete sightseeing tour of Lisbon, it would be 28 tram. It starts from Martim Moniz, up the narrow streets of Alfama, and continues along the Baixa up the hill to Chiado.

The whole experience is like being in an old movie. Details of chrome, the smell of polished wood, the howls of breaks and the noise of an ancient machine facing the hills of Lisbon. It is an experience that deserves attention. Some of the most beautiful places to stand on are Miradouro de Nossa Senhora do Monte, a unique view of the churchyard; and There are several places to escape and check out along the way. We recommend Miradouro das Portas do Sol, a great place to drink while admiring the red roof and colorful houses in Alfama.

The tram can be very busy, so go as fast as you can. Alternatively, start at Praça Martim Moniz, stopping right behind the famous tourist start. However, don’t expect a seat at any time of the day, it’s all part of the fun. The Viva Viagem card can be used to pay for the ticket.

As the best sightseeing route through Lisbon, the number 28 is gaining popularity, but it is still a good thing to do in a town of 7 hills.

10 – GO WITH ELEVADOR DA GLÓRIA MIRADOURO DE SÃO PEDRO DE ALCÃNTARA

Set high in a panoramic garden, Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcãntara is one of the most beautiful points in Lisbon. Greek buses and decorated fountains give the area a high altitude. It has hot views in Lisbon, collecting all the unique buildings that make this city attractive.

There are plenty of places to grab a drink and look good.

The best way to get to the view is Elevador de Glória, a mountain-climbing funeral from Rossio. The area is known as Lisbon’s street art center. The tram itself is covered with graffiti. The wall on the side of the track has been worked by well-known local and international artists. Walking down the side of the tram tracks to check graffiti was one of our favorite things to do in Lisbon.

Take the Elevador de Gloria funicular to Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcãntara in one of the most beautiful parks in Lisbon.

11 – CHECK THE CHURCH OF THE DOMINGOS

The Igreja de São Domingos is a celestial church with its proper place of suffering. The worst earthquake of the year was 1755, and in 1959 a fire was destroyed. The roof was demolished and rebuilt, but the reconstruction left the walls with severe scars, a reminder of both incidents.

The drama is visible when you enter the church. Large, hollow columns and badly damaged walls give it a caber but somewhat pleasant appearance. Many of the paintings that were damaged in the fire have not been replaced, leaving the orange walls illuminated by the pure green light that looks empty and exposed.

Some say that it still smells of fire today. It really has a nice sound somewhere that has just been destroyed, and walking around the church, easily uses other senses.

Church of São Domingos / 7:30 am – 7pm | Price: Free

The Igreja De São Domingos was badly damaged in an earthquake in 1755, and it was destroyed in 1959.

12 – CHECK THE BOMBER CERTIFICATE

A lazy tour exploring the bohemian side of Lisbon, head to Príncipe Real. Home to artists and writers, pop-up designers, creative and adventurous designers, this corner of Lisbon is a relaxed, tourist-free shopping center.

Most of the action centers around Praça do Príncipe Real, a small garden with large houses converted into construction studios and mind shops. Embaixada is a shopping center in the magnificent Moorish palace showcasing Portuguese designers, food and experiences. The 21pr Concept store is perfect if you really want to impress someone with a great Portuguese gift.

Many stores remain open too late to allow for a smooth transition into a meal hour. Cinco Lounge has enhanced the art of drinking with old and contemporary cocktails delivered in a bright candle-lit space. With dinner, it’s hard to beat Gin Lovers with their fresh food and botanical love

A lazy tour exploring the bohemian side of Lisbon, head to Príncipe Real.

13 – CHECK OUT MORE IN CONVENTO MAKE CARMO

The remains of the Gothic Convento do Carmo are monuments to the devastation of the 1755 earthquake. It is also the product of 19th-century fashion to leave ruins untouched. Now open to the sky, open porches and private walls are a lovely place for archeology scattered with statues, tombstones and pillars.

The Carmo Archaeological Museum is located on the site of an old church building. It contains a strange and wacky collection of 19th-century art objects. Among the treasures, you can find the tomb of King Ferdinand I, an Egyptian mother and two horrible Peruvian corpses. Slightly disturbing is the collection of 16th century azulejo (handmade tile).

The palace is used as a base for summer concerts held in the square in front of the ruins, which is a great place to relax and have coffee.

Convento do Carmo / 10am – 6pm (October-April); 10 am – 7pm (May-Sep) | Price: € 5 (€ 4 students / adults)

The Carmo Archaeological Museum, found in an old church nest, houses an intricate and wacky collection of 19th-century artifacts.

14 – HAVE A COUNTRY COUNTY IN CEVICHERIA

After a morning shopping at Bairro Alto and Príncipe Real, stop for lunch at A Cevicheria. The basis of the menu is the Peruvian dish Ceviche, served with Portuguese flavors and flair. Scallops with edible vegetables with succulent branches, ginger, tapioca and green apples were hit hard with us.

Try and get points in the chair where you can view the handicrafts of the chefs who make the dishes with careful precision. If you like lunch given a little drama this is your place. With a large octopus attached to the roof, it attracts the attention of passersby, who are jealous of your ringide seat.

They have a wide range of wines, but all are well cleaned with their pisco sours.

Observing the clever construction of ceviche dishes from the counter at A Cevicheria is one of our main things to do in Lisbon.

15 – LISTEN TO FADO PROTECTION BY TASCA DO CHICO

Listening to Fado’s powerful fight is one of the things to do in Lisbon that everyone should hear at least once. Fado nights usually take place in a small local restaurant. Traditional Portuguese instruments are interrupted by a single-voice singing intervention, accompanied by a Portuguese guitar.

It’s an experience that goes well. The crowded sound bar comes in completely quiet to listen intently to the sounds coming from the area. There are few other live games that are completely relevant.

On the internet you will hear a lot about Fado which is real and not so real, which no doubt has some merit. But as a newcomer to the knowledge, it is probably best to stay in a place where you are happy. A great way to get around Bairro Alto. Choose a place where you hear singing reaching the street. Alternatively, Tasca do Chico offers a good fado feeling.

It is a heartwarming experience to hear the loud noisy bar coming in completely silent listening intently to Fado’s powerful breeze.

THINGS TO DO IN LISBON / OTHER VIEW

These are our 15 highlights that we think you should not miss on your next visit to Lisbon. But every good trip requires extra work to get the most out of your destination. Here is our favorite resort, coffee and bar in Lisbon.

LIVING MUSIC IN LISBON

Not surprisingly, the nightlife in Lisbon is alive and kicking. Bairro Alto is a major street party and live music venue in Lisbon. Follow the smooth jazz sounds from Páginas Tantas or beat the dance floor to the 80 Classics with the sympathy of the Portuguese in Portas Largas.

WINE AND MARKS IN THE WAR

Portugal’s love of wine could be a waste of time and there is nothing wrong with that. The BA Wine Bar in Bairro Alto is a cool little bar with 150 glasses on the list. Mesón Andaluz has a selection of quality Iberian wines in the perfect public view. The Antiga Wine bar in Alfama has a special offer with the best tapas made with local ingredients. Cinco Lounge is a beautiful place with great cocktails.

WE HAVE CHOSEN A LISBON FOOD SCENE

The over-the-counter lunch at A Cevicheria is a special experience thanks to their ingenious hand in creating unusual ceviche dishes. The small but attractive Taberna da Rua das Flores has a small menu of traditional Portuguese offerings. Restaurante Pharmacia is a beautiful modern restaurant that takes the pharmacy theme from decoration to dish. Our favorite restaurant in Lisbon, however, is the dark and close-up Artis Wine Bar.

LEAVE BREAK

The art coffee shop has left its mark in Lisbon. Hello, Kristof is a special coffee training center with a small selection of breakfast. Copenhagen Coffee Lab is an easy option to choose from, producing regular good coffee. The Heim Café is a brightly colored area, better for brunch than coffee and the Fábrica Coffee Roaster serves black and grilled meat. On-site roasted coffee at Wish Slow Coffee House is likened to the art of baristas.

The critical coffee business is being tested at the Wish Concept Store at LX Factory.

WHERE TO STAY IN LISBON

Unfortunately, Airbnb has sold large numbers of locals outside of Lisbon, so we would recommend booking a hotel if possible.

Lisbon is a cohesive city, but it is still a good idea to stay in the center as much as possible. We recommend staying in Baixa / Chiado, Bairro Alto or Alfama. All of these places produce the charm you want in Lisbon and are located in the center. This will allow you to start very early in the morning, fueled by grab-and-go pastel de nata, before sneaking back home after a night’s sleep listening to live music.

LISBON ACTIVITIES / PREVIOUS VIEWS

Most attractions in Lisbon do not require pre-booking. However, if you are traveling at peak times, you may want to book ahead to line up. Here are a few interesting tips to book in advance.

LISBON CARD

With access to 23 museums and free tram passes, the Lisbon Card is the most expensive way to see the highlights of the city.

FADO

Nothing brings you to the soul of Lisbon more than the Fado show. The 50-minute play includes 2 musicians and 2 guitarists who will perform for hours. Book tickets here.

NUMBER 28 TRAM

The 28 tram can be busy and difficult to get to. If you want to get rid of stress, book this tram and travel experience to learn more about the different parts of Lisbon.

IMUSEU COLEÇÃO BERARDO

The queue for the best contemporary art offerings in Lisbon can be long, so book ahead and skip the online tickets before you go.

The best way to travel in Lisbon is on foot, where the heart of the city is located on very narrow lanes and very narrow bars.

HOW TO GET A LISBON

Lisbon has a complete public transport network including trams, funiculars, buses and the highway. The Viva Viagem card is a quick and easy way to pay for all your travels. The card costs € .50 and can be charged for individual tickets, over the day (€ 6.40 / £ 5.95 / $ 7.90), or for a balance of up to € 40 which you can use as you pay as you go.

However, the best way to travel to Lisbon is to travel. Our 3-day trip to Lisbon puts everything in order, so you don’t have to spend a lot of time finding between places.

HOLY TIME TO GO TO LISBON

The best time to visit Lisbon is during the March to May and September to October periods. This is a great time to explore the city on foot where temperatures are generally comfortable and with fewer tourists. You can also collect transactions for a little cheaper accommodation at this time.

Like most parts of Europe, summer is a time when both temperatures and tourists are high. In winter it can be wet and windy, although in Lisbon it is rarely too cold.

HOW MUCH TIME DO YOU WANT TO LISBON?

Most of the highlights in Lisbon can be seen in 2 days. It is a city connected with the advent of good local travel, so, getting in the middle of all the attractions works.

However, our recommendation is to spend 3 days in Lisbon. This allows you to see all the beautiful things of history and enjoy local entertainment. It is also a time to wander the streets and soak up the wind.

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